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True or False: You Can Drive on a Flat Tire

Flat Tire

Photo Credit: Flickr/Mike Mozart

True or False: You Can Drive on a Flat Tire

By Carolyn Hauck on September 28, 2015

This is the type of true or false question you’d like to know the answer to without ever having to find out for yourself through experience: If you get a flat tire while driving can you drive on the flat?

The answer lies in modern technology and Gary, a mechanic on JustAnswer tells us why and how:

“You can temporarily drive on a flat tire only if it is a run flat tire. If it is not a run flat tire, you  can’t drive on the flat as it will destroy the rim and the vehicle will be unstable to drive. It doesn’t matter if you have a  2- wheel drive, all-wheel drive or rear-wheel drive car, if the tire is flat and NOT a run flat you cannot or should not drive it.

If you have run flat tires, you can drive the car to the repair shop, but keep in mind, even with run flat tires, they’re only good for about 50 to 60 miles. These tires are designed for a small amount of miles--just enough to get you to the shop if you’re in a stranded situation or don’t know how to change a flat on your own.

Run flat tires are tires reinforced with either a supportive sidewall or ring system that protects the vehicle’s rim while you drive, and generally come standard in cars now. Check your car’s manual to see if your car has run flat tires, or talk with a Mechanic about the pros and cons of investing money to have your non-run flat tires replaced.

Aside from sudden punctures on the road or blow outs, Gary reminds people to check their tires for nails or screws, a common reason why tires deflate. Patching a nail or screw puncture is an easy fix, and if it’s not dealt with, could destroy the tire.