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True or False: Sparkling water strips your teeth of enamel

True or False: Sparkling water strips your teeth of enamel

Photo Credit: Flickr/Tekke

True or False: Sparkling water strips your teeth of enamel

By Carolyn Hauck on February 26, 2015

When it comes to carbonated beverages, the science behind the bubbles can get a little misinterpreted. For many years now and because of certain studies published in the 90s, there’s been a misconception that the carbonic acid created from the carbonation process in sparkling water erodes the enamel on your teeth. 
 
Because sparkling water also shares the carbonation aspect with other carbonated beverages like sodas, tonic water and club soda, it sometimes gets the bad rap that these sugary and mineral beverages do. Sparkling water with no other sugars, sodium or minerals, is simply plain water that’s gone through a process of dissolving carbon dioxide in the water. The carbonation this process creates is not harmful to teeth enamel. It’s the sugars, sodium and other additives in other carbonated drinks that have a harmful effect your dental health. 
 
But a dentist on JustAnswer does make an important point about carbonation and tooth enamel, that of not taking proper care of your teeth. He explains that extended exposure to carbonation can have an effect on tooth enamel, if you’re not brushing your teeth every day. So stick to the recommended brushing and flossing 2-3 times a day, and enjoy as much sparkling water as you’d like.
 
Final verdict? False. Sparkling water doesn’t strip your teeth of enamel. 
 
Do you drink more than 1 soda a day? Talk with a dentist to see if this could be affecting your oral health.